Oyster Whore Spreads Herpes

  • By MyAlterEgo on

    August 11, 2010

  • No, this is not about some oyster loving whore, who is spreading herpes to her unfortunate mates. This is about actual oysters carrying herpes. And you wonder why they are always acting so clammy (ziinnnggg!!). Okay, I know oysters are not a clam (they in fact have many differences: check them out), but they sure as hell look very similar.

    The herpes disease is beginning to spread throughout the oysters in Europe, due to the increasingly warm waters. The first thing that pops into your head....Global Warming.

    I am not an environmentalist, nor do I sit here and worry about the polar ice caps melting away. Scientists, geologists, and many others have been constantly warning -- well, everyone really -- that our polluting ways will one day destroy our very Earth. I have heard their cries, but it is still not going to influence my lifestyle. I live how I want to live, not to save the planet (I do recycle by the way; see I do my part).

    Back on topic. National Geographic stated:

    In July lab testing of farmed oysters detected the first known United Kingdom cases of herpes in the shellfish. The virus has already killed between 20 to 100 percent of breeding Pacific oysters in some French beds in 2008, 2009, and 2010, according to the French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea (Ifremer).

    The reason for oyster herpes's emergence in Pacific oysters off England remains a mystery, though global warming may have played a part, experts speculate.

    A new strain named Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) ╬╝var (mew-var), the virus remains dormant until water temperatures exceed 16 C [61 degrees F], which U.K. waters reach in the height of summer, according to Kevin Denham of the British government's Fish Health Inspectorate.
    The article went on to say:

    Though oyster herpes can't be transmitted to humans, it does threaten the fishing industry, since dead oysters are unsafe for eating—and that's exactly what worries oyster harvesters such as Seasalter Shellfish.

    Based in the southeastern English city of Whitstable, where oysters have been harvested for centuries, Seasalter this summer became the first company to discover the herpes-ravaged oysters in the U.K.
    It is a good thing us humans cannot receive the virus from these horny little oysters, because, let's face it, we already have enough venereal diseases walking around the streets. We can thank Paris Hilton for a good percentage of them (Yatsi!!).

    In case you did not click the link above, head over to National Geographic and read the rest of the article. There are some nice little tidbits I left out.

    1 comments:

    Online Flash Games said...

    Sea life is better instead by ordinary life. National Geographic know better.

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